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HeartMath: New breathing technique methods against everyday stress

HeartMath: New breathing technique methods against everyday stress


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Easy to learn: new breathing technique method should help against stress
The workload on the job is increasing for more and more people. The constant stress and long working hours are often an enormous burden. Many feel burned out. A new breathing technique method can help you cope better with stress.
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With new breathing technique method against stress
The workload of some employees often increases to levels that are hazardous to health. According to health experts, employers are also responsible for burnout and stress and the resulting mental health problems such as depression. It is therefore only fair if the companies make a contribution to supporting employees in the fight against stress. This is what happens in the Netherlands: there, the police use a breathing technique method to better manage stress.

Police officers rely on breathing and focusing technology
In the Netherlands, police officers are encouraged to use a special breathing and focusing technique to better deal with stress and emotions. Saarbrücken manager Reiner Krutti also offers courses of this kind in Germany, Austria and Switzerland using the so-called “HeartMath” method. According to the information, this procedure is about the heart rhythm pattern and the possibility of actively influencing it.

Technology is easy to learn
According to the expert, the technology is easy to learn and can be used at any time, so changes in the heartbeat pattern can be made visible on the smartphone. On the website of "HeartMath Germany" it says: "You can read exactly how high your current level of exhaustion or stress level is."

In the past, it was mainly therapists and doctors who learned this method, but more and more companies are integrating “HeartMath” into their everyday work. According to Krutti, 34,000 police officers in the Netherlands are now using this technique.

Interplay between breathing, heartbeat and blood pressure
"Since the difficult situations in which police officers keep getting into can hardly be prevented or changed, they have to be put in a better position to deal with them," writes Krutti on the blog "heartmathdeutschland.de". Therefore, the “Mental Force” (Mental Force) program was launched in the Netherlands. An important element of this program is "heart coherence", the coordinated interplay between breathing, heartbeat and blood pressure.

Effects on the immune system
“We achieve heart coherence through breathing and focusing exercises that are as simple as they are effective. With this language of the heart we influence our emotional brain and thus our emotions at the place where they arise, "writes" HeartMath Germany ". According to their blog, "just five minutes of consciously feeling a pleasant emotion and appreciation" have a positive effect on our immune system.

Different methods for stress relief
According to Krutti, the new technology is used to prepare for difficult situations, to react as best as possible in the situation itself, and to recover quickly afterwards. However, other stress relief methods also help. These include autogenic training, progressive muscle relaxation or yoga. But only with "HeartMath" is it possible to make success visible. This motivates those affected. (ad)

Author and source information



Video: HeartMath Freeze Frame (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Trahern

    This very good phrase has to be precisely on purpose

  2. J?n

    With talent ...

  3. Nastas

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  4. Griffyth

    Find it wrong?

  5. Goltijas

    well, as they say, time erases error and polishes the truth

  6. Enda

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