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Morbid early puberty: breasts at two and menopause at five


Five-year-old has already reached puberty and is now facing menopause

Most women do not experience menopause until they have reached the age of 40. But Emily Dover from Gosford, New South Wales in Australia already has breasts, pubic hair and her days and is now at the age of five before menopause. She suffers from hormone disorders that cause her body to go through an extremely accelerated development.

Emily started developing breasts at the age of two, she had her period at four and now she is about to go through the menopause, reports Tam Dover, a mother in the British daily "Mirror", about her child's illness. Emiliy "didn't even have the chance to be a little girl," the mother continued. After a long period of uncertainty about the girl's symptoms, various hormone disorders were diagnosed, including Addinson's disease. Together with their daughter, the parents are now hoping for hormone replacement therapy to help Emiliy.

Emily grew extremely quickly in the first few months

Five-year-old Emily Dover was born a little baby and the youngest of three children. Everything seemed normal at birth, but the girl grew extremely quickly in the coming months. The parents were concerned about the enormous growth, but the attending doctors always found seemingly plausible explanations, even when Emily developed the first symptoms. At around two years of age, she developed breasts, strong body odor and cystic acne, the mother continues. Her menstruation began at the age of four. But the doctors were still puzzled.

Addinson disease noted

Emily underwent a series of tests at the Pediatric Acute Care Unit at Wyong Hospital, which her mother reported showed a pregnant woman's hormone levels. But despite the extensive examinations, the doctors were initially unable to give a “definitive answer”, reports Tam Dover. The only thing that was certain was that something was very wrong with the little girl. This summer, Emily was finally diagnosed with Addinson's disease, which disrupts steroid hormone production in the adrenal glands.

Hope for a normal life

Now Emily is already about to go into menopause, with all the complaints that also show up in adult women, reports the mother. The parents rely on hormone replacement therapy to bring the girl's hormonal balance back into balance. After that, she will have completed her menopause and hopefully be able to live a reasonably normal life, Tam Dover said. However, there are many aspects of the disease. So far, Emily was only too young to be aware of her reach. But when she starts school next year, she will have to deal with why she is so different from all other children, the mother explains.

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